Book Report: The Past and Future City by Stephanie Meeks

Book Report: The Past and Future City by Stephanie Meeks

I optimistically checked out a fat stack of preservation-related books at the University of Georgia library and lugged them up to Maine for self-assigned summer reading. The Past and Future City by Stephanie Meeks (Island Press, 2016 link: https://islandpress.org/book/the-past-and-future-city) has been on my list for quite some time. The president and CEO of the National Trust for Historic Preservation since 2010, Meeks echoes ideas that are buzzing in the preservation world and support the message of Max Page’s lecture. That preservation is much more than house museums, it’s an evolving field that should play an important role in addressing some of our most hot-button issues such as affordable housing and climate change. To do this, she outlines 10 steps communities can take to harness the power of their existing building stock and protect historic resources. Here are my Cliff Notes:

11 Things to do in Fall 2018

11 Things to do in Fall 2018

To use a term from Mary Berry of the Great British Bake Off, this fall is cram-jam full with history, architecture, and community events. Organizations all over the region are in a celebratory mood, from our own Preservation Awards, to an architecture-inspired costume party. This fall you can take a musical stroll, have a reason to say “Happy Terrcentential!”, and trick-or-treat at a Portland icon and so much more.

Catching Up with Landmarks' 2018 Graduate Interns

Catching Up with Landmarks' 2018 Graduate Interns

This summer we have the privilege of being joined by four graduate level interns for 10 weeks to survey off-peninsula Portland neighborhoods. They have brought with them their fresh enthusiasm for historic preservation and their knowledge about what is happening in the preservation world from academia to other parts of the country.  Our Director of Advocacy, Julie Larry, has been guiding them through the process and will present on their research this summer and fall. The second part of our Deering Highlands research will be presented on August 28. More details below. 

I interrupted their research this morning to ask them how their summer is going.  Here is what they had to say!  - Chloe Martin

The Transforming Triple-Decker

The Transforming Triple-Decker

 From factory workers and stenographers to electricians and developers, triple-decker buildings transformed the way working-class families lived in Portland at the turn of the 20th century and beyond.

Now,many of the remaining triple-deckers are being transformed into high-end condiminiums. What is the history of this distinctly urban architecture in Portland? 

Preservation Month 2018

Preservation Month 2018

Here are 8 Great ways to celebrate Preservation Month this May!

1

Be your own tour guide through a changing neighborhood.

We uploaded all 4 of the Munjoy Hill walking tours to our website.

2

Make a Preservation Plan for your older building.

Having an older building can be overwhelming but you don’t have to do everything all at once…

Are Historic Preservation and Affordable Housing Advocates on the Same Side?

Are Historic Preservation and Affordable Housing Advocates on the Same Side?

The short answer is YES.

Landmarks has been discussing how Historic Preservation and Affordable Housing fit together. Here are 4 resources that we found helpful that we want to share!

1) This is an article by the National Trust for Historic Preservation that takes a serious look at the link and disconnect between the two.

2) Directory of Advocacy, Julie Ann Larry, is attending a conference called "Preserving Affordability, Affording Preservation" and you can too!

African-American Associated Building on Munjoy Hill, Part 2

From the mid 19th century onward the neighborhood on Lafayette and Merrill Streets was home to a number of Portland’s black residents. using US Census records we know that some black residents were native to Maine, but many were from Canada, particularly from Nova Scotia. Others came to Portland from Guadaloupe, Jamaica, Cape Verde, West Indies, Portugal, and other states like North Carolina, Virginia, New York, Wisconsin, and Georgia. Using city directories and US Census records we know that some men worked as seaman, waiters, janitors, stewards, cooks, clerks, hotel porters, house painters, and laborers. While many women in the neighborhood stayed home, others worked as laundresses, seamstresses, housekeepers, and elevator operators.

African-American Owned Buildings in early 20th Century on Munjoy Hill, Part 1

African-American Owned Buildings in early 20th Century on Munjoy Hill, Part 1

From the mid 19th century onward the neighborhood on Lafayette and Merrill Streets was home to a number of Portland’s black residents, many of whom worked on Portland’s waterfront or in nearby businesses. While some black residents were native to Maine, many were from Canada, particularly from Nova Scotia. Others came to Portland from Guadaloupe, Jamaica, Cape Verde, West Indies, Portugal, and other states like North Carolina, Virginia, New York, Wisconsin, and Georgia. The men worked as seaman, waiters, janitors, stewards, cooks, clerks, hotel porters, house painters, and laborers. While many women stayed home, others worked as laundresses, seamstresses, housekeepers, and elevator operators.