Are Historic Preservation and Affordable Housing Advocates on the Same Side?

Are Historic Preservation and Affordable Housing Advocates on the Same Side?

The short answer is YES.

Landmarks has been discussing how Historic Preservation and Affordable Housing fit together. Here are 4 resources that we found helpful that we want to share!

1) This is an article by the National Trust for Historic Preservation that takes a serious look at the link and disconnect between the two.

2) Directory of Advocacy, Julie Ann Larry, is attending a conference called "Preserving Affordability, Affording Preservation" and you can too!

African-American Associated Building on Munjoy Hill, Part 2

From the mid 19th century onward the neighborhood on Lafayette and Merrill Streets was home to a number of Portland’s black residents. using US Census records we know that some black residents were native to Maine, but many were from Canada, particularly from Nova Scotia. Others came to Portland from Guadaloupe, Jamaica, Cape Verde, West Indies, Portugal, and other states like North Carolina, Virginia, New York, Wisconsin, and Georgia. Using city directories and US Census records we know that some men worked as seaman, waiters, janitors, stewards, cooks, clerks, hotel porters, house painters, and laborers. While many women in the neighborhood stayed home, others worked as laundresses, seamstresses, housekeepers, and elevator operators.

African-American Owned Buildings in early 20th Century on Munjoy Hill, Part 1

African-American Owned Buildings in early 20th Century on Munjoy Hill, Part 1

From the mid 19th century onward the neighborhood on Lafayette and Merrill Streets was home to a number of Portland’s black residents, many of whom worked on Portland’s waterfront or in nearby businesses. While some black residents were native to Maine, many were from Canada, particularly from Nova Scotia. Others came to Portland from Guadaloupe, Jamaica, Cape Verde, West Indies, Portugal, and other states like North Carolina, Virginia, New York, Wisconsin, and Georgia. The men worked as seaman, waiters, janitors, stewards, cooks, clerks, hotel porters, house painters, and laborers. While many women stayed home, others worked as laundresses, seamstresses, housekeepers, and elevator operators.

Who is Max Page?

Who is Max Page?

rofessor Page teaches and writes about the history of cities and architecture. His lecture will draw on his most recent book Why Preservation Matters (Yale University press, 2016), a thought-provoking assessment of the preservation movement that offers a progressive vision for the future of preservation. Anyone interested in how to honor our past while working toward an equitable and sustainable future for our community will gain insight from Professor page’s ideas.

2017 Places in Peril Announced

2017 Places in Peril Announced

Concerned that a number of historic properties in the Portland area are in danger of being irreparably altered or destroyed, we announced our 4th list of Places in Peril, to call attention to the threats facing character-defining, historically-significant properties in greater Portland. This year, Landmarks has identified seven buildings or areas that are at critical points where they could be permanently lost or diminished.

Executive Director, Hilary Bassett said, these properties help define greater Portland. In every case, the properties we’ve identified are...

Woodford Food & Beverage: Resuscitating an Old Classic

Woodford Food & Beverage: Resuscitating an Old Classic

As they were rolling up their sleeves to start interior renovations of their future restaurant, Woodford Food & Beverage, Birch Shambaugh asked Fayth Preyer what she hoped to discover once they started peeling away decades of office use in the building at 660 Forest Avenue in Portland.  She let herself dream, “what if there were terrazzo floors?!”

Adaptive re-use is a strategy promoted by historic preservation that encourages developers to turn historic buildings into...

Heritage for a 40 Foot Lot

Heritage for a 40 Foot Lot

Written by Charles Hartfelder
Photos by Heath Paley

Today the midcentury modern look is all around us. As the architecture of the modernist movement has come of age, its historical significance is now eligible to receive all the benefits of historic designation. Its unique situation at the crux of modern homebuilding innovation in the 20th century will be remembered as the forbearer of the open-plan ideal of the 21st.